login about faq

To prove you're not a spammer, email newuser.lgqa@gmail.com with the subject "Account Request" to request an account.


Will this network setup work?

  1. Router
  2. Switch
  3. Router 1
  4. Router 2
  5. Computer

Routers and PC are Plug in to switch

asked Jul 30 '12 at 15:29

BanksCool's gravatar image

BanksCool
1141416

edited Jul 30 '12 at 15:41

the image wasn't showing, I re-added it, and I would think so

(Jul 30 '12 at 15:38) pjob797 pjob797's gravatar image

Will The 2 Routers Have Issues with ips?

(Jul 30 '12 at 15:43) BanksCool BanksCool's gravatar image

I'm really not good with networking, but the IP addresses are auto assigned so there shouldn't be a conflict, but then again networking, I've really never had enough experience, but unless the device is preset for an IP, its auto assigned by the main router or switch or what have you

(Jul 30 '12 at 15:45) pjob797 pjob797's gravatar image

Ok, thanks, I think that answers my question. Thanks !

(Jul 30 '12 at 15:46) BanksCool BanksCool's gravatar image

As long as you're not trying to use a switch as a gateway it should be ok.

(Jul 30 '12 at 20:19) ClosetFuturist ClosetFuturist's gravatar image

YOu need only one thing on your network that has DHCP enabled. Every other switch or router should have it disabled. You setup should go:

Internet connection> Router (DHCP enabled) > To other computers and switches.

My network in my house is like this picture:

alt text

answered Jul 30 '12 at 18:09

TheTechDude's gravatar image

TheTechDude
17.4k4195305

Assumptions:

  • You are using home-class or consumer-grade gear. (i.e not enterprise routers)
  • You want all your devices in one Class-C home Network. (i.e Same network ID for all devices )

Things You need to do:

  1. Only ONE router may act as DHCP server.

  2. Typically if you have one internet connection, Only ONE router will be your gateway to the internet and act as modem.

  3. Remember to change the default IPs of each router so that they don't conflict on the network. (Most routers come with default IPs like 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.0.1. Keep your main router with that IP if you wish but change the IPs of the other routers to 192.168.1.x or 192.168.0.x. Additionally, add these manually-configured IPs as reserved IPs in the DHCP settings of your one and only router that acts as DHCP server)

  4. As stated in your question, all routers and PCs are connected to a switch. Otherwise, you might need to pay attention to straight-through vs crossover wiring of the cables as router-to-router connections are a bit different. (Some old gear do not support auto-detection of cable alignment "crossover vs straight-through")

  5. Typically, the above should work seamlessly. However, some old gear might still be a pain in the butt. If and only if you run into some problems or some PCs weren't "Seeing" the connection, you might need to enable RIP protocol so routers can exchange their routing tables and no forwarding problems occur. You do that by enabling the RIP protocol (Outgoing direction) on your one and only router that acts as internet gateway while enabling the same protocol in (Incoming direction) on your other routers.

This answer is marked "community wiki".

answered Jul 30 '12 at 23:36

TjWallas's gravatar image

TjWallas
271369

wikified Jul 31 '12 at 19:32

Your answer
toggle preview

Follow this question

By Email:

Once you sign in you will be able to subscribe for any updates here

By RSS:

Answers

Answers and Comments

Markdown Basics

  • *italic* or __italic__
  • **bold** or __bold__
  • link:[text](http://url.com/ "title")
  • image?![alt text](/path/img.jpg "title")
  • numbered list: 1. Foo 2. Bar
  • to add a line break simply add two spaces to where you would like the new line to be.
  • basic HTML tags are also supported


Tags:

×317
×133
×20

Asked: Jul 30 '12 at 15:29

Seen: 942 times

Last updated: Jul 31 '12 at 19:32